herb

looking. listening. learning. reading. spewing. regurgitating. traveling. living. blogging from a far corner in japan about anything and everything.cheers.
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obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer
Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.
She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 
Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a
After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.
Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.
Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.
In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.
Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.
Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia
(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)
Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:
Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”
Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”
Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

Awesome women!

obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day: Air Pioneer

Lettice Curtis had her pilot’s license for only three years when she was recruited to Britain’s Air Transport Auxiliary (ATA) in 1940. The ATA’s sole mission was to ferry aircraft in and around the British Isles to make them accessible for members of the Royal Air Force. A shortage of male pilots forced the ATA to invite women to join, and Ms. Curtis was one of the first.

She was also the best. During her five years of service Ms. Curtis transported more than 1500 aircraft. Everything from Spitfire fighter planes, to the two-engine multi-purpose Mosquito, to the Lancaster four-engine bomber, had to be flown by Ms. Curtis, often solo and using only a map for navigation. Ms. Curtis was, in fact, the first woman in the world to qualify to fly four-engine bombers including the American B-17 Flying Fortress. She gained national attention in October 1942 when she met and shook hands with Eleanor Roosevelt and Clementine Churchill. 

Ms. Curtis was one of 166 women served in the ATA, which was dubbed ”Always Terrified Airwomen” by cynical journalists when the program was first expanded. The pilots came not just from the United Kingdom but also the U.S., The Netherlands, and Poland. Fifteen women lost their lives while serving in the ATA, a remarkably low death rate for pilots asked to fly at all hours and in all types of weather.a

After the end of World War II, Ms. Curtis hoped to fly in a professional setting but with the end of the war came the end of a need for women pilots. Like so many other women of the era Ms. Curtis was pushed aside to make room for the men returning from the front. While interviewing for a test pilot position with one company, she heard and entire boardroom break into laughter when told she was waiting in the lobby.

Ms. Curtis found her way airborn by participating in the air racing circuit. And she continued to excel. Flying in a borrowed Spitfire, Ms. Curtis set a women’s record in the 100 km closed loop race in 1948. Later, in her own private plane, she raced nationally against all pilots, male and female.

Later in life, she also took it upon herself to tell the story of the ATA and wrote The Forgotten Pilots which was published in 1971. She wrote her autobiography, Lettice Curtis, in 2004.

In 2008, Ms. Curtis and fourteen other surviving women who flew for the ATA were honored by the British government for their service in the war with a special patch. (The men of the ATA were recognized as well.) “The Forgotten Pilots” had finally gotten their due.

Lettice Curtis, who earned her helicopter pilot’s license at the age of 77, died on July 21, 2014 at the age of 99.

Sources: Telegraph, The Guardian, The Daily Mail, and Wikipedia

(Image of Lettice Curtis stepping into the cockpit of a Spitfire sometime during World War II is courtesy of The Daily Mail)

Other women pilots featured on Obit of the Day:

Nadhezda Popova - One of the Sovet Union’s “Night Witches”

Betty Skelton - Dubbed “The Fastest Woman on Earth”

Patricia Wilson - Member of Philadelphia’s Civil Air Defense in WWII

Awesome women!

image

I’m trying to identify why I am so blue with Brazil’s loss in the World Cup against Germany today. It’s very strange since I hardly know anything about football, and I’m not even Brazilian! But I guess I can empathise with Brazilians in a lot things.

In the Philippines, the new “national hero” is Manny Pacquiao, a boxing champion. Whenever he fights, the entire country is at a standstill. Even criminals stop making crimes. Everyone is hooked and watching with bated breath in front of the TV. This man has come to embody the country’s fighting spirit; short and not even well-educated, he was able to make a name for himself through boxing. And what a fighter he is! I can only surmise that football is what Manny Pacquiao to the Philippines. I am however, not even a fan of boxing.

But I grew to become interested in football since Japan is in the WC, and having been surrounded by Brazilian friends, and with my partner S talking about football all the time (S has excellent me memory on football stuff despite not being a fan, according to her), the fever has infected me. Well yeah, I don’t wanna wake up at 4am to watch the games, but I try to keep track of all of Brazil’s matches.

When you come from a country that’s beset with social, economic and political problems, the opportunity to forget all the problems around you is a saving grace. For an hour or so, people become embroiled in a world where it’s a one on one fight, and the chance of winning is 50-50. It’s like a salve that heals wounds, albeit temporarily. The US, Germany, Netherlands, etc. are countries that excel in the sciences, engineering, technology… and wins bags of medals during the summer and winter Olympics. But for countries such as the Philippines, winning that one boxing match becomes a source of shining pride. I can imagine how it must be for Brazil too, to become big winners on an international stage, and feel like they’re on top of the world and unbeatable in at least one thing, whether it be boxing or football!

So yeah, I’m blue for Brazil today. Because I can only imagine what it’s like to go back to being beaten.

Photo source: https://twitter.com/Neesli_K/status/486618962390568961/photo/1

I wrote do many words that I have forgotten most of them.

Waaaaaah cuteness!

(via angrynerdyblogger)

natashakline:

For all the artists out there. xoxo

You’re an artist!

(via sosuperawesome)

erinsuxx:

finally done the story of the “virgin” mary and her immaculate conception for my sequential art final.  very happy with how this came out/that it’s finished.

This is hilarious!

(via angrynerdyblogger)

Places. Places.

(via angrynerdyblogger)

His illustrations caught my attention in Sandman. Here he is again, at his erotic best.

Sexy times, everyone.

togetherwecanrecover:

sammneiland:


mybuttisaurus:


i-justreally-like-cats-okay:



Calming CAT!



oh my god it is calming


i think we could all use some calming cat right about now.



He’s back! Welcome back, calming cat. You are always welcome here.

Calming cat.

togetherwecanrecover:

sammneiland:

mybuttisaurus:

i-justreally-like-cats-okay:

Calming CAT!

oh my god it is calming

i think we could all use some calming cat right about now.

He’s back! Welcome back, calming cat. You are always welcome here.

Calming cat.

(via purekojohn)

fujiaski:

"how will i explain gay couples to my children”

if you can explain to your children that an immortal man in a red suit who lives in the north pole travels around the entire world on one night every year on a sleigh carried by magical flying deer i think itll be easy enough to tell them two people are in love

(via icanliveinsidemyhead)